Identifying Marks

The Japanese have one of the longest continuous ceramic cultures in the world, with the earliest ceramics dating to around 10 BC. Tea ceremony from the 15th century The popularity of the tea ceremony from the 15th century fostered an aesthetic appreciation of ceramics, especially imported Chinese wares, which became valued as works of art. The strong demand for ceramics resulted in a surge of creativity during the Momoyama period , with thousands of kilns developing their own distinct regional characteristics. High-fired stoneware were central to this tradition. Ri Sampei, the “father” of Japanese porcelain After the Japanese invasions of Korea in and , a number of skilled Korean potters who had learned from the Chinese how to produce fine porcelain, were brought back to Japan. Some of these settled in Arita in northern Kyushu, where they discovered porcelain clay.

Dating Japanese Ceramics by Backstamps – A Short Reference Guide!

Stamp used until This means the oldest intact pieces are among the rarest. One such period occurred when Allied troops were present in Japan. From to , Noritake tableware stamps indicated they were made in Occupied Japan. During this tough economic period, many Japanese factories had to curtail production. In , with the war just ended and resources at a premium, the company was temporarily unable to produce goods that met its high standards, so it called its products Rose China rather than Noritake.

New mark entirely green.

German marks are perhaps the most difficult to track down and form the biggest section of mark identifications See more on the overall picture of the development of American pottery marks and the main companies involved here. For example, post-war Japanese export china often uses Western looking marks. On close inspection though the production often has giveaway clues of origin.

More on Japanese and Chinese wares here Similarly, the word ‘Limited’, or ‘Ltd’ was not used until the ‘s or thereafter. Whereas, the letter ‘R N’ which stand for ‘Registered Number’ – see above photo was later and didn’t start until the ‘s. You see, so knowing your pottery marks is all about putting feelers out to pick up the subtle clues. But What About Value? Now, we had to separate out the ‘valuation’ aspects from the identification forums because they started to get messy and go off topic.

Identification is one thing, valuations are quite another. Appraisals need an expert impartial eye with no question of a vested interest creeping in. So for valuation requests and that covers a lot of people we had to invent a quicker paid for service – the best online I would say that because I run it – but it’s true. For those not sure whether their items are worth the appraisal fee, I wrote a couple of different pages suggesting how you might do a bit of research on the value yourself first.

Aynsley backstamp dating

Sumida Noritake Morimura Bros. Nippon Toki Kaisha factory from a picture inside of a Noritake bowl dated February 19th, , commemorating the new Showa emperor Hirohito’s visit to the Nagoya factory in his second year on the throne. On the inside the picture is surrounded by the newly invented lusterware surface.

Book “Some Suggestions for Souvenir Seekers” Mid s To further our understanding of 20th century porcelain marks our friend Elyce Litts recently sent me some notes from a small booklet entitled “Some Suggestions for Souvenir Seekers” produced by the Japanese Government Railway.

By Mary Barile Antique Appraiser Noritake is a china collector’s dream, with thousands of colorful, hand painted patterns and ceramic designs appearing on everything from pin trays to dinner plates, vases to teapots. This may be the perfect choice for anyone seeking an affordable, elegant, and sometimes whimsical, collectible. The shop was successful, but the brothers continued to look for new products for American customers. They knew that china and porcelain were used in every home for dining, washing up, or displaying the family’s good taste with decorative pieces, but European factories had production locked up.

Although not technically the same, “china” and “porcelain” are often used interchangeably, and refer to a white, translucent ceramic. In , Ichizaemon visited the Paris World Exposition and seeing fine French porcelain, was inspired to create porcelain for the U.

Japanese Porcelain Marks

This is just a general guide and, as always, individual pieces may vary! Pre – Items imported to the U. Most Japanese ceramics were not stamped with any backstamp or they were marked with the Artist’s or Manufacture’s name in Japanese. In the Tariff Act has amended to make the words “Made In” in addition to the country of origin mandatory. This was not rigorously enforced until around so some pre pieces can still be found without the “Made In” phrase.

They quite often will have a company logo.

All lines in the old mark are solid and heavy.

Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Noritake China: They initially produced a full range of china marked with the Nippon mark and also sold china in-the-white, ie; blanks for decorating by outside agencies and decorators, thus the quality of the earlier finished product can vary. They registered their first Noritake back stamp around and registered their first Noritake mark in the USA around Genuine Examples of Noritake China Scroll through as we present a few examples of antique china by Noritake, showing the range of decoration used, the forms and the associated Noritake China marks on the piece.

Noritake China is Highly collectible The above and below examples are taken from the antique-marks collection and we regularly buy and sell Noritake china, particularly examples from the s and the Art Deco Period. There is high demand for good quality pieces, even with some wear to the handles, which is quite common, and they can fetch good prices.

Japanese porcelain has almost always been good quality and has almost always been collected But Noritake is probably the lesser cousin to the more desireable Kakiemon, Satsuma, Kutani and Imari porcelain wares. However we find it appeals to oriental porcelain collectors and that there is a good market for it. The tableware was produced for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.

Identifying Marks

What used to be a painstaking job to find matching marks for your treasures using ouliated books or catalogs is now available online at your fingertips. Simply determine the overall shape of the mark on your item and click on the page that lists all backstamps or signatures that look the same. Our services work on all such devices and there is no need to download or use any special software or apps. They are easy and intuitive to use and can save you time and money.

Our specialists are also always on stand-by to answer any of your questions and your communication with us remains private and personal.

The Noritake company was concerned that the quality of their work was not up to the highest standards because good materials were scarce, so they instead sometimes used a “Rose China” mark.

Products displayed in these tables are not for sale unless otherwise stated. They are included here merely for informational purposes and as examples of items on which the marks are found. Any photographs or other information on this website may not be copied or used by others without our prior permission. Viewer contributions are acknowledged accordingly and are also protected under our copyright notice and may not be copied or used by others without our permission.

We welcome and appreciate your submissions. Please be sure to tell us how you would like to be acknowledged for your contributions — by full name or by initials only, or even anonymous, although we do prefer first and last names. We also like to know your general location such as city, state, country, region, etc. We will honor your wishes and appreciate your help.

In business from under the name Abdingdon Sanitary Manufacturing Company, making plumbing fixtures. The name was changed to Abingdon Potteries in Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U. In business since

Japanese Porcelain Marks

The Company’s Japanese name changed to Noritake Co. Back stamps placed on chinaware express the high spirits of the pioneers of the ages and symbolize vital strength of Japanese pottery which has spread to all parts of the world. Back stamp for domestic market, registered in Japan. RC stands for Royal Crockery fine china. The symbol design is called “Yajirobe” toy of balance. It symbolizes the balance in management.

There is white space between the body of the sun and the bottom of the rays.

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1928 Noritake Hand Painted Tennis Set